Monthly Archives: July 2009

ESCAPE with Jeremy Scott

Last Thursday was a very wonderful day. Last Thursday was the day that I was lucky enough to receive my very own pair of Jeremy Scott Adidas Wings. I have been admiring (and obsessing over) these trainers from afar for a couple of months in various fashion magazines and online. Until last Thursday they were but a legend. A trainer so beautiful, it was almost intangible.

It all happened in a meeting I attended with Adidas, during which a girl walked by carrying a jumper shaped like a Giraffe.  Jeremy Scott is a fashion designer from Kansas City whose wacky street designs and collaborations have won him acclaim within the world of high fashion and with the likes of Madonna, Kanye West, Bjork, Nas & Kelis to name but a few. Scott’s style is bold and eccentric, iconic and ironic, and the Giraffe  jumper had his name written all over it.

giraffe

Having spotted it mid-meeting I could not restrain myself from abandoning all forms of etiquette and yelping in the manner of a crazed boyband loving teenager  – ” OMG, OMG thats by Jeremy Scott!” I proceeded to rant on about how I was in awe of his winged Greek-god/ess like, 80s style basketball trainers before remembering that I was indeed in a business meeting and should proabably shut the hell up. Quite amazingly it was thanks to my uncontrolled display of heated Scott/Adidas passion that I found myself in the Adidas stock room with a pair of white wings in my hand and a beaming smile on my face.

adidas-x-jeremy-scott

With wings on my ankles I feel like I could take off at any moment. With wings on my ankles I feel like I am walking on air. Have I ever actually worn my wings out in public I hear you ask? Well no, not yet. I am waiting for the right time to present itself, which I am sure it will. At the moment I am quite content to prance around my flat in them every now and again or to gaze at them, sitting there, pristine on their blue adidas box in my bedroom.

Thankyou Jeremy Scott and thankyou M@Adidas for my wonderful, wonderful gift.

To indulge in a bit more of Jeremy Scott’s Wild creativity (I’m also a huge fan of his Carebear militia fabric) take a look at his website –

www.jeremyscott.com

ESCAPE with Alice in Wonderland

I could not be more of a fan of Alice in Wonderland. LOVE the book. LOVE the characters. LOVE the storyline. LOVE the Disney film – great songs. But lets be honest…one of the best things about Alice in Wonderland, is that Lewis Carroll was probably as high as a kite when he created this masterpiece and lets be even more honest, little blonde Alice frolicking in her brightly coloured cartoon Disney Land conveys little of the dark intensity that we associate with the original novel.  So I assume I am not alone when I say, for this….. I CAN NOT WAIT…….

– watch out for some familiar faces, the cast is ridiculous!(ly good)

http://www.wired.com/underwire/2009/07/first-look-new-alice-in-wonderland-trailer/

alice-burton-wonderland

ESCAPE with Steve Strange

Steve Strange just called our office. Having always known that he’s good mates with my boss, I’ve been waiting to intercept one of his calls for about 6 months and today was my lucky day. As it turned out, our chat was better than I could ever have hoped for. It went a little something like this:

STEVE: Who’s this?

ME: Sara…Can I take a message?

STEVE: Nah Nah Sara, If you re to take anything from this conversation,  it should be this….You got a pen?

The Contract is possibly in tact.

It’s in Korea and its insincere.

No longer taken

by a smiley grin

and the shake of a fake tan handshake.

So maybe if in Britain

Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!

Literally…not a clue. LEGEND.

-SW

Our conversation inspired an impromptu Visage session as a kind of office tribute to Steve and his strangeness…..Fade to Grey.. Oh What a tune! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cznha2YTTh0

ESCAPE with a snog

For those of you that think snog is one of the most irritating words in the english slanguage, let me tell you that up until a week ago, I would have put myself forward to be leader of your alliance. However…whilst wondering through Soho during a lunch break, I came across something  that forced me to reconsider my opinion of the word.

Snog… so I learnt, is a new chain of Frozen yoghurt stores. Take my advice : you can not let your snog agitation prevent you from enjoying one of the most delicious and refreshing summer treats that the streets of London have to offer.

For you see…beyond the rubbish name, lies a world of frozen yoghurt…and an innovative modern marketing and branding experience. I had a natural snog which I got with blueberrys and strawberries on top. After one taste it all made sense to me. Snog is a brightly coloured with fun interiors… snog is a delicious frozen yoghurt that’s healthier  than ice cream (organic ingredients and ZERO fat) and snog is a concept that brings modern kitsch to London – in a  Harijuku kind of way. Furthermore….it’s about bloody time that London got some frozen yoghurt…they ‘ve had it in LA for donkeys years. With that all in mind I decided that I really like snog and that I’m gonna snog a lot more should I be around Soho on my lunch break.

snog_strawberry

For those of you that choose not to listen to me and still find it annoying….

SNOG SNOG SNOG SNOG SNOG SNOG SNOG SNOG

check out the snog blog  – http://www.ifancyasnog.com/snog_shops/

-SW

ESCAPE with Bazooka Joe and some Early Punk Rock

Bazooka Joe were the British Punk band before British Punk even existed. With The Sex Pistols as their support act, the Bazooka boys tore up the London Pub/club circuit in the 70s catalyzing a change within British music that eventually saw Punk take its place as Rock’s no.1 rival within mainstream music worldwide.   I interviewed  ex- Bazooka bassist Chris Duffy to find out what it was like to be a founding father of punk….

ME: Hi Chris. So tell me a bit about what it was that Bazooka Joe set out to do…

CHRIS: I wasn’t actually there when Bazooka Joe were formed. The band was the brainchild of John Ellis (later of The Vibrators,) Stuart Goddard, ( to become Adam Ant,) and Danny Kleinman. I was seventeen years old and had been playing in a shitty blues type band that I can’t even remember the name of, when I got a job photographing Kleinman’s girlfriend.  It was around this time that Goddard quit and so I offered to step in as bassist.

ME: They say you boys were responsible for the birth of the punk music movement however, looking at the Bazooka Joe photo, I don’t spot any of the angst or anarchic qualities usually associated with Punk.

CHRIS: Its funny, we never set out to change anything or start anything. We weren’t politically driven or angry, we were just boys who enjoyed playing music. We enjoyed the camaraderie of it all; writing music together, getting drunk together and picking up girls together. It’s easy to reflect upon a time and apply labels to various cultural factions. We were playing in a time when Punk didn’t even really exist, our role in establishing Punk was therefore not a literal one it was more  conceptual. We represented a generation who were bored.   The 60’s were groundbreaking and exciting. They had The Beatles, The Stones, Dylan and Hendrix. By ’66 Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young were around, but after this came a period of what I like to call, ‘smoke and mirrors bands,’ where emphasis was less on musical content and more on bigger performances. It was a post-hippy era of self-indulgence and the music industry was saturated with flaccid, mediocre Glam Rock bands such as The Sweet for example. Junk.

ME: So you started with Junk and made it Punk?

CHRIS: Ha. Well yes, I suppose so. Our reaction to the banality of the musical situation in Britain was “Punk.” We were driven by a logic that said “Fuck all of that music. We’ re a new generation and we think it’s a load of bollocks.” We wanted to define our own generation.

ME: Whilst all of this was kicking off in England there was a similar uprising in the U.S with the formation of bands such as The Ramones. Did this in anyway influence the direction of your music?

CHRIS: We were definitely influenced by bands from across the atlantic but it was mainly older Do-wopp stuff such as Sha-Na-Na and American Rock & Roll stars like Frankie Valli. Our look was pretty Grease Lightening at the start, we slicked our hair and wore leather biker jackets. Like The Ramones though, we looked at our clean cut influences and tried to give them edge when applying them to our own music. This was all in about ’74, Punk didn’t really happen until ’75 and it hit the public in ’76.

ME: So you never jumped on the Westwood/ McLaren mohawk and saftey pin bandwagon?

CHRIS: Well yeh, of course we did to some extent. But that was all a bit later on. We used to play to audiences packed full of hardcore punks at The Vortex, those who couldn’t afford the real Westwood stuff would come in bin bags safety pinned together. I remember thinking I was going to die one night. Everyone used to spit at you whilst you played, it was a sign of adoration. We used to come of stage covered in golly. It was amazing though, there was a huge amount of energy.

By 1977 when Punk was in full swing, Bazooka Joe disbanded. By this point the band had become less niche and had acquired a cult following, so it is unsurprising that their musical influence managed to transcend both genre and generation. Ex-members saw that Bazooka Joe played their role in the music of the greats, such as The Pistols, The Vibrators and Adam and the Ants. The Bazooka influence also infiltrated the musical output of numerous lesser known Punk bands as well as the Ska scene with bands like The Specials and The Police looking to their music for inspiration. Madness also covered one of their songs; “Rockin’ in A Flat,” on their debut album One Step Beyond. British rock did not go untouched either, with bands such as The Stranglers and The Jam picking up on the Bazooka vibe. Whether or not they consider themselves to be responsible for the creation of the Punk sound, it is clear that Bazooka Joe were an important stimulus for British music at a time when it needed a kick up the back side. Their spot at the top of NME’s Punk family tree is one that I believe, is truly deserved.

Bazooka

Bazooka Joe

For more on the history of Punk Rock visit Noise for Heroes – www.nkvdrecords.com

-SW

ESCAPE to The Hideout

DON LETTS

My first shoot that I have worked on for The Hideout came out in a German magazine called StreetWear last week. For “Here Come the Heads,” Graffiti artist TEK 13 www.optdesign.com, and I collaged our office walls and floor with old posters from the store. We invited friends and family of the Hide Out (boys only,) to pose for us and photographer Neil Bedford www.neilbedford.com combined forces with stylist Stephen Mann www.theonplace.com to pull together a distinctivly relaxed, black and white set of portraits that reflect the Hideout  vibe down to a T. I’ve chosen a couple of my favourites here. To see the full 10page shoot check out StreetWear July/August/September, Issue 29. www.stw2d.de

VARIOUS

IAN BROWN

-SW

ESCAPE with The Hangover

If you haven’t already seen it…you should probably stop what you re doing…roll up a Jamaican and head to a cinema near you NOW. This film is so good that we got there late, on a sunday night, and had to sit in the god damn front row, and I still loved it. Boys will love it because it’s set in Vegas. Girls will love it because the guy who plays Phil (Bradley Cooper) is unbelievably hot. The storyline is great and takes very few brain cells to engage with, the movie isn’ too long and The Hangover 2 is already in the making. Sweetness.

-SW

Hot Stuff